Ranking The 50 Greatest College Football Players Of All Time

By Jason Fletcher

One thing you’ll find by reading this list is that the greatest college football players of all time didn’t necessarily translate to NFL success. With the types of schemes that have been run at the college level throughout history, stats and dominance are often inflated. When you’re reading through this list, count the number of guys who never made it in the NFL, I bet the answer will shock you.

Jason Fletcher is a Senior Writer for RantSports.com. Follow him on Twitter @JasonFletcher25, “Like” him on Facebook or add him to your network on Google+.

Ranking The 50 Greatest College Football Players Of All Time
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50. WR Michael Crabtree, Texas Tech

WR Michael Crabtree, Texas Tech Credit: Getty Images
In two seasons at Texas Tech, Crabtree totaled 231 receptions for 3,127 yards and 41 touchdowns. He was a unanimous first-team All-American selection in both seasons, and also the Fred Biletnikoff Award winner in both years.

50. WR Michael Crabtree, Texas Tech

In two seasons at Texas Tech, Crabtree totaled 231 receptions for 3,127 yards and 41 touchdowns. He was a unanimous first-team All-American selection in both seasons, and also the Fred Biletnikoff Award winner in both years.

49. QB David Klingler, Houston

QB David Klingler, Houston Credit: Getty Images
Klingler only started at Houston for two seasons, but compiled 9,430 career passing yards and 91 touchdowns in only 31 total career games. He held the NCAA record for most passing touchdowns in a season after he threw 54 in 1990, but that record was broken by Hawaii QB Colt Brennan in 2006.

49. QB David Klingler, Houston

Klingler only started at Houston for two seasons, but compiled 9,430 career passing yards and 91 touchdowns in only 31 total career games. He held the NCAA record for most passing touchdowns in a season after he threw 54 in 1990, but that record was broken by Hawaii QB Colt Brennan in 2006.

48. LB Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma

LB Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma Credit: Getty Images
Bosworth was a two-time Dick Butkus Award winner, two-time Consensus All-American and All-Big 8 in three seasons. He was also an Academic All-American in 1986. Amazingly, Bosworth finished fourth in Heisman voting in 1986, despite playing linebacker.

48. LB Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma

Bosworth was a two-time Dick Butkus Award winner, two-time Consensus All-American and All-Big 8 in three seasons. He was also an Academic All-American in 1986. Amazingly, Bosworth finished fourth in Heisman voting in 1986, despite playing linebacker.

47. WR Howard Twilley, Tulsa

WR Howard Twilley, Tulsa Credit: Twitter
In three seasons at Tulsa, Twilley recorded 231 catches, 3,343 receiving yards and 32 touchdowns in only 30 career games. In 1965, Twilley had a ridiculous 134 receptions for 1,779 yards and 16 touchdowns alone. He was voted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1992.

47. WR Howard Twilley, Tulsa

In three seasons at Tulsa, Twilley recorded 231 catches, 3,343 receiving yards and 32 touchdowns in only 30 career games. In 1965, Twilley had a ridiculous 134 receptions for 1,779 yards and 16 touchdowns alone. He was voted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1992.

46. RB Reggie Bush, USC

RB Reggie Bush, USC Credit: Getty Images
Bush won the 2005 Heisman Trophy, but later had it stripped away for off-field incidents. He also won the Doak Walker and Walter Camp Awards in 2005, was a two-time Consensus All-American and helped lead USC to two AP National Championships. In his three-year career at USC, Bush had 528 touches on offense and racked up 4,470 yards from scrimmage and 38 touchdowns, while adding four return touchdowns and a passing touchdown.

46. RB Reggie Bush, USC

Bush won the 2005 Heisman Trophy, but later had it stripped away for off-field incidents. He also won the Doak Walker and Walter Camp Awards in 2005, was a two-time Consensus All-American and helped lead USC to two AP National Championships. In his three-year career at USC, Bush had 528 touches on offense and racked up 4,470 yards from scrimmage and 38 touchdowns, while adding four return touchdowns and a passing touchdown.

45. RB O.J. Simpson, USC

RB O.J. Simpson, USC Credit: Getty Images
Simpson was one hell of a running back before he decided to "allegedly" murder his ex-wife and her friend. Prior to that, he won the 1968 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Pop Warner Trophy, while also adding the Walter Camp Award in 1967. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983. Simpson holds the record for the largest margin of victory in Heisman Trophy voting, as he beat Leroy Keyes by 1,750 points.

45. RB O.J. Simpson, USC

Simpson was one hell of a running back before he decided to "allegedly" murder his ex-wife and her friend. Prior to that, he won the 1968 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Pop Warner Trophy, while also adding the Walter Camp Award in 1967. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983. Simpson holds the record for the largest margin of victory in Heisman Trophy voting, as he beat Leroy Keyes by 1,750 points.

44. LB Derrick Thomas, Alabama

LB Derrick Thomas, Alabama Credit: Getty Images
Thomas won the Dick Butkus Award and was a unanimous All-American selection in 1988. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014. Thomas also finished 10th in the Heisman voting in 1988.

44. LB Derrick Thomas, Alabama

Thomas won the Dick Butkus Award and was a unanimous All-American selection in 1988. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014. Thomas also finished 10th in the Heisman voting in 1988.

43. QB Ty Detmer, BYU

QB Ty Detmer, BYU Credit: Getty Images
Detmer won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Davey O'Brien Award in 1990. In 1991, he also won the Sammy Baugh Award, in addition to his second consecutive Davey O'Brien Award. The Cougars quarterback was also a consensus All-American in both seasons. For his career, Detmer threw for 15,031 yards and 121 touchdowns in 48 games.

43. QB Ty Detmer, BYU

Detmer won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Davey O'Brien Award in 1990. In 1991, he also won the Sammy Baugh Award, in addition to his second consecutive Davey O'Brien Award. The Cougars quarterback was also a consensus All-American in both seasons. For his career, Detmer threw for 15,031 yards and 121 touchdowns in 48 games.

42. WR Trevor Insley, Nevada

WR Trevor Insley, Nevada Credit: Twitter
Insley is the NCAA record holder in a number of receiving categories including most career receiving yards (5,005), most 200-yard receiving games (6) and most 100-yard receiving games (26). He's also third in career receptions with 298 and holds the NCAA single-season records for most receiving yards with 2,060, and most receiving yards per game in a season with 187.3.

42. WR Trevor Insley, Nevada

Insley is the NCAA record holder in a number of receiving categories including most career receiving yards (5,005), most 200-yard receiving games (6) and most 100-yard receiving games (26). He's also third in career receptions with 298 and holds the NCAA single-season records for most receiving yards with 2,060, and most receiving yards per game in a season with 187.3.

41. RB LaDainian Tomlinson, TCU

RB LaDainian Tomlinson, TCU Credit: Getty Images
For his career, Tomlinson rushed for 5,387 yards and 56 touchdowns in four seasons at TCU. In his junior and senior seasons combined, Tomlinson had 4,132 yards and 42 touchdowns alone. He was a Consensus All-American in 2000, and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014.

41. RB LaDainian Tomlinson, TCU

For his career, Tomlinson rushed for 5,387 yards and 56 touchdowns in four seasons at TCU. In his junior and senior seasons combined, Tomlinson had 4,132 yards and 42 touchdowns alone. He was a Consensus All-American in 2000, and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014.

40. RB Billy Sims, Oklahoma

RB Billy Sims, Oklahoma Credit: Getty Images
Sims was the 1978 Heisman Trophy winner and was a two-time Consensus All-American at Oklahoma. He rushed for 4,023 yards on 578 career carries and scored 51 touchdowns for the Sooners.

40. RB Billy Sims, Oklahoma

Sims was the 1978 Heisman Trophy winner and was a two-time Consensus All-American at Oklahoma. He rushed for 4,023 yards on 578 career carries and scored 51 touchdowns for the Sooners.

39. DE Leon Hart, Notre Dame

DE Leon Hart, Notre Dame Credit: Getty Images
Hart is the only lineman to win three NCAA championships and three NFL championships. He also won the Heisman Trophy and Maxwell Award at Notre Dame in 1949. Hart, Angelo Bertelli and Cam Newton are the only three players in history to win the Heisman Trophy, National Championship and be drafted No. 1 overall in the NFL Draft within the same calendar year.

39. DE Leon Hart, Notre Dame

Hart is the only lineman to win three NCAA championships and three NFL championships. He also won the Heisman Trophy and Maxwell Award at Notre Dame in 1949. Hart, Angelo Bertelli and Cam Newton are the only three players in history to win the Heisman Trophy, National Championship and be drafted No. 1 overall in the NFL Draft within the same calendar year.

38. DT Merlin Olsen, Utah State

DT Merlin Olsen, Utah State Credit: Getty Images
Olsen won the 1961 Outland Trophy and was voted a Consensus All-American in both 1960 and 1961. He was the star of the Utah State defense that only allowed 139.4 yards and 7.6 points per game in 1961, while only allowing 6.8 points per game in 1960.

38. DT Merlin Olsen, Utah State

Olsen won the 1961 Outland Trophy and was voted a Consensus All-American in both 1960 and 1961. He was the star of the Utah State defense that only allowed 139.4 yards and 7.6 points per game in 1961, while only allowing 6.8 points per game in 1960.

37. DE Hugh Green, Pittsburgh

DE Hugh Green, Pittsburgh Credit: Getty Images
Green won the Walter Camp, Maxwell and Lombardi Awards in 1980, while finishing second in Heisman Trophy voting. He was a three-time first-team All-American selection and recorded a whopping 53 sacks during his four seasons with the Panthers.

37. DE Hugh Green, Pittsburgh

Green won the Walter Camp, Maxwell and Lombardi Awards in 1980, while finishing second in Heisman Trophy voting. He was a three-time first-team All-American selection and recorded a whopping 53 sacks during his four seasons with the Panthers.

36. T Orlando Pace, Ohio State

T Orlando Pace, Ohio State Credit: Getty Images
Pace was quite possibly the greatest offensive tackle to ever play college football. He was a two-time Consensus All-American, two-time Lombardi Award winner and he won the Outland Trophy in 1996.

36. T Orlando Pace, Ohio State

Pace was quite possibly the greatest offensive tackle to ever play college football. He was a two-time Consensus All-American, two-time Lombardi Award winner and he won the Outland Trophy in 1996.

35. WR Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma

WR Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma Credit: Getty Images
Broyles was the NCAA all-time record holder in receptions when he left Oklahoma, but the record has since been broken by Justin Hardy. Broyles is also second to Trevor Insley in career receiving yards. He was also a two-time Consensus All-American and two-time First-team All-Big 12.

35. WR Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma

Broyles was the NCAA all-time record holder in receptions when he left Oklahoma, but the record has since been broken by Justin Hardy. Broyles is also second to Trevor Insley in career receiving yards. He was also a two-time Consensus All-American and two-time First-team All-Big 12.

34. QB Case Keenum, Houston

QB Case Keenum, Houston Credit: Getty Images
Keenum threw for 19,217 yards, 155 touchdowns and only 46 touchdowns in four seasons at Houston. He was also a two-time Sammy Baugh Award winner and finished in the top-8 of Heisman Trophy voting in two seasons.

34. QB Case Keenum, Houston

Keenum threw for 19,217 yards, 155 touchdowns and only 46 touchdowns in four seasons at Houston. He was also a two-time Sammy Baugh Award winner and finished in the top-8 of Heisman Trophy voting in two seasons.

33. LB Mike Singletary, Baylor

LB Mike Singletary, Baylor Credit: Getty Images
Singletary recorded 662 tackles for the Bears, while being selected as an All-American twice. He also won the Davey O'Brien Memorial Trophy twice before the trophy was changed to be given to the nation's best quarterback.

33. LB Mike Singletary, Baylor

Singletary recorded 662 tackles for the Bears, while being selected as an All-American twice. He also won the Davey O'Brien Memorial Trophy twice before the trophy was changed to be given to the nation's best quarterback.

32. DT Lee Roy Selmon, Oklahoma

DT Lee Roy Selmon, Oklahoma Credit: Getty Images
Selmon was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1988 after winning the Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy in 1975. Head coach Barry Switzer called Selmon the best player he had ever coached, after he recorded 40 sacks in his four seasons in Norman.

32. DT Lee Roy Selmon, Oklahoma

Selmon was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1988 after winning the Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy in 1975. Head coach Barry Switzer called Selmon the best player he had ever coached, after he recorded 40 sacks in his four seasons in Norman.

31. RB Marcus Allen, USC

RB Marcus Allen, USC Credit: Getty Images
Allen was the recipient of the Chic Harley Award, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, the Pop Warner Trophy and the Heisman Trophy all in 1981, after he rushed for 2,342 yards and 22 touchdowns. Allen was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

31. RB Marcus Allen, USC

Allen was the recipient of the Chic Harley Award, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, the Pop Warner Trophy and the Heisman Trophy all in 1981, after he rushed for 2,342 yards and 22 touchdowns. Allen was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

30. C/LB Chuck Bednarik, Pennsylvania

C/LB Chuck Bednarik, Pennsylvania Credit: Getty Images
Bednarik played both center and linebacker at Penn, while also the occasional punter. He won the Maxwell Award in 1948 and was a three-time All-American. Bednarik is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

30. C/LB Chuck Bednarik, Pennsylvania

Bednarik played both center and linebacker at Penn, while also the occasional punter. He won the Maxwell Award in 1948 and was a three-time All-American. Bednarik is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

29. LB Tommy Nobis, Texas

LB Tommy Nobis, Texas Credit: Getty Images
Nobis was one of the greatest linebackers in the history of College Football. He won the Outland Trophy and Maxwell Award in 1965 as a senior, and was a key piece to the Longhorns' 1963 National Championship team as the only starting sophomore.

29. LB Tommy Nobis, Texas

Nobis was one of the greatest linebackers in the history of College Football. He won the Outland Trophy and Maxwell Award in 1965 as a senior, and was a key piece to the Longhorns' 1963 National Championship team as the only starting sophomore.

28. DT Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska

DT Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska Credit: Getty Images
Suh recorded 49.5 tackles for loss and 24 sacks during his four seasons with the Cornhuskers, a remarkable feat for a defensive tackle. He won the 2009 Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Bill Willis Trophy, Lombardi Award, Chuck Bednarik Award and Outland Trophy, and finished fourth in Heisman voting.

28. DT Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska

Suh recorded 49.5 tackles for loss and 24 sacks during his four seasons with the Cornhuskers, a remarkable feat for a defensive tackle. He won the 2009 Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Bill Willis Trophy, Lombardi Award, Chuck Bednarik Award and Outland Trophy, and finished fourth in Heisman voting.

27. RB Ron Dayne, Wisconsin

RB Ron Dayne, Wisconsin Credit: Getty Images
Dayne rushed for 135 yards and 71 touchdowns for the Badgers, while winning the 1999 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, Doak Walker Award, Jim Brown Award and Chic Harley Award. In that season alone, Dayne collected 2,034 yards rushing and 20 touchdowns.

27. RB Ron Dayne, Wisconsin

Dayne rushed for 135 yards and 71 touchdowns for the Badgers, while winning the 1999 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, Doak Walker Award, Jim Brown Award and Chic Harley Award. In that season alone, Dayne collected 2,034 yards rushing and 20 touchdowns.

26. DB Charles Woodson, Michigan

DB Charles Woodson, Michigan Credit: Getty Images
Woodson finished his career with 18 interceptions and won the 1997 Heisman Trophy, Walter Camp Award, Chic Harley Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Chuck Bednarik Award, Jim Thorpe Award and Jack Tatum Trophy. Woodson's the only primary defender in College Football history to win the Heisman Trophy. He's also the last player to win the award that didn't play running back or quarterback.

26. DB Charles Woodson, Michigan

Woodson finished his career with 18 interceptions and won the 1997 Heisman Trophy, Walter Camp Award, Chic Harley Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Chuck Bednarik Award, Jim Thorpe Award and Jack Tatum Trophy. Woodson's the only primary defender in College Football history to win the Heisman Trophy. He's also the last player to win the award that didn't play running back or quarterback.

25. DB Deion Sanders, Florida State

DB Deion Sanders, Florida State Credit: Getty Images
Sanders was a two-time Consensus All-American defensive back and was the Jim Thorpe Award recipient in 1988. He recorded 14 interceptions throughout his career and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

25. DB Deion Sanders, Florida State

Sanders was a two-time Consensus All-American defensive back and was the Jim Thorpe Award recipient in 1988. He recorded 14 interceptions throughout his career and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

24. RB Ernie Davis, Syracuse

RB Ernie Davis, Syracuse Credit: Getty Images
Davis was the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy when he brought home the honor in 1961. He also won the Walter Camp Memorial Trophy that same season after rushing for 823 yards on 150 carries and scoring 14 total touchdowns in only ten games.

24. RB Ernie Davis, Syracuse

Davis was the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy when he brought home the honor in 1961. He also won the Walter Camp Memorial Trophy that same season after rushing for 823 yards on 150 carries and scoring 14 total touchdowns in only ten games.

23. C Dave Rimington, Nebraska

C Dave Rimington, Nebraska Credit: Facebook
Rimington is considered the greatest center in College Football history after the award for the best center in the country every year was named after him. In 1981, Rimington won the Outland Trophy. In 1982, he won his second straight Outland Trophy and was also named the Lombardi Award winner.

23. C Dave Rimington, Nebraska

Rimington is considered the greatest center in College Football history after the award for the best center in the country every year was named after him. In 1981, Rimington won the Outland Trophy. In 1982, he won his second straight Outland Trophy and was also named the Lombardi Award winner.

22. S Ronnie Lott, USC

S Ronnie Lott, USC Credit: Getty Images
Lott helped lead the Trojans to the 1978 National Championship, and 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls. He was a unanimous All-American selection in 1980 and team captain. Lott recorded 14 interceptions during three seasons at USC, including eight in 1980.

22. S Ronnie Lott, USC

Lott helped lead the Trojans to the 1978 National Championship, and 1979 and 1980 Rose Bowls. He was a unanimous All-American selection in 1980 and team captain. Lott recorded 14 interceptions during three seasons at USC, including eight in 1980.

21. QB Vince Young, Texas

QB Vince Young, Texas Credit: Getty Images
During his three-year stint at Texas, Young threw for 6,040 yards and 44 touchdowns, and rushed for 3,127 yards and 37 touchdowns. While Young never won the Heisman Trophy, he led the Longhorns to a monumental upset of USC in the 2005 National Championship Game. That season, Young won the Maxwell Award, Archie Griffin Award, Manning Award and the Davey O'Brien Award.

21. QB Vince Young, Texas

During his three-year stint at Texas, Young threw for 6,040 yards and 44 touchdowns, and rushed for 3,127 yards and 37 touchdowns. While Young never won the Heisman Trophy, he led the Longhorns to a monumental upset of USC in the 2005 National Championship Game. That season, Young won the Maxwell Award, Archie Griffin Award, Manning Award and the Davey O'Brien Award.

20. DB Al Brosky, Illinois

DB Al Brosky, Illinois Credit: Getty Images
Brosky is the NCAA record holder for most interceptions in a career, with 29. Amazingly, he reached that mark in only three seasons with the Fighting Illini. Brosky was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1998.

20. DB Al Brosky, Illinois

Brosky is the NCAA record holder for most interceptions in a career, with 29. Amazingly, he reached that mark in only three seasons with the Fighting Illini. Brosky was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1998.

19. WR Randy Moss, Marshall

WR Randy Moss, Marshall Credit: Getty Images
After stops at Notre Dame and Florida State, which included two off-field incidents that kept Moss from playing football, he ended up at Marshall. There he was a First-team All-American in 1996 and 1997. Moss also won the Fred Biletnikoff Award in 1997 after amassing 96 receptions for 1,820 yards and 26 touchdowns. In his two seasons for the Thundering Herd, Moss racked up 174 catches for 3,529 yards and a whopping 54 touchdowns.

19. WR Randy Moss, Marshall

After stops at Notre Dame and Florida State, which included two off-field incidents that kept Moss from playing football, he ended up at Marshall. There he was a First-team All-American in 1996 and 1997. Moss also won the Fred Biletnikoff Award in 1997 after amassing 96 receptions for 1,820 yards and 26 touchdowns. In his two seasons for the Thundering Herd, Moss racked up 174 catches for 3,529 yards and a whopping 54 touchdowns.

18. RB/DT Bronko Nagurski, Minnesota

RB/DT Bronko Nagurski, Minnesota Credit: Getty Images
In 1929, Nagurski was an All-American at running back after leading the nation in rushing, and also at defensive tackle. One of the awards given out to the nation's best defensive player today is named after Nagurski.

18. RB/DT Bronko Nagurski, Minnesota

In 1929, Nagurski was an All-American at running back after leading the nation in rushing, and also at defensive tackle. One of the awards given out to the nation's best defensive player today is named after Nagurski.

17. RB Howard Cassady, Ohio State

RB Howard Cassady, Ohio State Credit: Getty Images
Cassady was a two-time All-American in 1954 and 1955. In 1954, he finished third in Heisman voting, before winning the trophy in 1955, along with Maxwell Award. Cassady scored 37 touchdowns in 36 games. He also played defensive back for the Buckeyes, reportedly never allowing a completion during four years on campus.

17. RB Howard Cassady, Ohio State

Cassady was a two-time All-American in 1954 and 1955. In 1954, he finished third in Heisman voting, before winning the trophy in 1955, along with Maxwell Award. Cassady scored 37 touchdowns in 36 games. He also played defensive back for the Buckeyes, reportedly never allowing a completion during four years on campus.

16. RB Glenn Davis, Army

RB Glenn Davis, Army Credit: Getty Images
Davis was a three-time Consensus All-American during Army's three-year National Championship run of 1944-46. He won the Maxwell Award in 1944, and the Heisman Trophy in 1946. He rushed for 2,309 yards and 36 touchdowns and caught 38 receptions for 790 yards and 12 touchdowns in 28 games at West Point. Davis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1961.

16. RB Glenn Davis, Army

Davis was a three-time Consensus All-American during Army's three-year National Championship run of 1944-46. He won the Maxwell Award in 1944, and the Heisman Trophy in 1946. He rushed for 2,309 yards and 36 touchdowns and caught 38 receptions for 790 yards and 12 touchdowns in 28 games at West Point. Davis was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1961.

15. LB Dick Butkus, Illinois

LB Dick Butkus, Illinois Credit: Getty Images
Butkus recorded 374 tackles during his three seasons with the Fighting Illini, as he was a unanimous All-American selection in 1963 and 1964. He finished sixth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1963, and third in 1964. Butkus was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983.

15. LB Dick Butkus, Illinois

Butkus recorded 374 tackles during his three seasons with the Fighting Illini, as he was a unanimous All-American selection in 1963 and 1964. He finished sixth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1963, and third in 1964. Butkus was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983.

14. FB Doc Blanchard, Army

FB Doc Blanchard, Army Credit: Getty Images
Teaming with Glenn Davis to form one of the most dominant backfields in College Football history, Blanchard scored 38 touchdowns and rushed for 1,908 yards during three seasons at West Point. He won the 1945 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Sullivan Award, and was a three-time All-American.

14. FB Doc Blanchard, Army

Teaming with Glenn Davis to form one of the most dominant backfields in College Football history, Blanchard scored 38 touchdowns and rushed for 1,908 yards during three seasons at West Point. He won the 1945 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Sullivan Award, and was a three-time All-American.

13. RB Earl Campbell, Texas

RB Earl Campbell, Texas Credit: Getty Images
Campbell was a two-time All-American at Texas, winning the 1977 Heisman Trophy and Davey O'Brien Memorial Trophy. He rushed for 4,443 yards and 40 touchdowns in 40 games for the Longhorns. Campbell was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1990.

13. RB Earl Campbell, Texas

Campbell was a two-time All-American at Texas, winning the 1977 Heisman Trophy and Davey O'Brien Memorial Trophy. He rushed for 4,443 yards and 40 touchdowns in 40 games for the Longhorns. Campbell was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1990.

12. RB Bo Jackson, Auburn

RB Bo Jackson, Auburn Credit: Getty Images
Jackson rushed for 4,303 yards and 26 touchdowns, while adding 26 catches for 272 yards and two touchdowns receiving during his four years at Auburn. He won the 1985 Heisman Trophy, Walter Camp Award and Chic Harley Award. If Jackson wasn't injured during his junior year, he could've finished near the top of this list.

12. RB Bo Jackson, Auburn

Jackson rushed for 4,303 yards and 26 touchdowns, while adding 26 catches for 272 yards and two touchdowns receiving during his four years at Auburn. He won the 1985 Heisman Trophy, Walter Camp Award and Chic Harley Award. If Jackson wasn't injured during his junior year, he could've finished near the top of this list.

11. QB Sammy Baugh, TCU

QB Sammy Baugh, TCU Credit: Getty Images
Baugh threw for 3,340 yards and 40 touchdowns in three seasons at TCU and was a two-time All-American. He finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1936 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

11. QB Sammy Baugh, TCU

Baugh threw for 3,340 yards and 40 touchdowns in three seasons at TCU and was a two-time All-American. He finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1936 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

10. RB Tony Dorsett, Pittsburgh

RB Tony Dorsett, Pittsburgh Credit: Getty Images
Dorsett won the 1976 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award and Chic Harley Award after rushing for 2,150 yards and 22 touchdowns. For his career, Dorsett totaled 6,526 yards and 59 touchdowns rushing, while adding 42 receptions for 415 yards and four touchdowns receiving. He was a three-time First-team All-American and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

10. RB Tony Dorsett, Pittsburgh

Dorsett won the 1976 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award and Chic Harley Award after rushing for 2,150 yards and 22 touchdowns. For his career, Dorsett totaled 6,526 yards and 59 touchdowns rushing, while adding 42 receptions for 415 yards and four touchdowns receiving. He was a three-time First-team All-American and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

9. RB Jim Thorpe, Carlisle

RB Jim Thorpe, Carlisle Credit: Getty Images
Thorpe played running back, defensive back, kicker and punter at Carlisle. He led Carlisle to an 11-1 record in 1911, including an 18-12 upset of No. 1 Harvard, where he scored all the team's points on four field goals and a touchdown. In 1912, he led Carlisle to a National Championship by scoring 25 touchdowns and 198 points. Thorpe was a two-time All-American and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

9. RB Jim Thorpe, Carlisle

Thorpe played running back, defensive back, kicker and punter at Carlisle. He led Carlisle to an 11-1 record in 1911, including an 18-12 upset of No. 1 Harvard, where he scored all the team's points on four field goals and a touchdown. In 1912, he led Carlisle to a National Championship by scoring 25 touchdowns and 198 points. Thorpe was a two-time All-American and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

8. QB Tommie Frazier, Nebraska

QB Tommie Frazier, Nebraska Credit: Getty Images
Frazier led the Cornhuskers to two consecutive National Championships, without losing a game in either season. He won the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, Quarterback of the Year and was the Big Eight Offensive player of the Year in 1995. Frazier was also a Consensus All-American during that season after throwing for 1,362 yards and 17 touchdowns, while adding 604 yards and 14 touchdowns rushing. For his career, Frazier threw for 3,521 yards and 43 touchdowns, and rushed for 1,955 yards and 36 touchdowns.

8. QB Tommie Frazier, Nebraska

Frazier led the Cornhuskers to two consecutive National Championships, without losing a game in either season. He won the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, Quarterback of the Year and was the Big Eight Offensive player of the Year in 1995. Frazier was also a Consensus All-American during that season after throwing for 1,362 yards and 17 touchdowns, while adding 604 yards and 14 touchdowns rushing. For his career, Frazier threw for 3,521 yards and 43 touchdowns, and rushed for 1,955 yards and 36 touchdowns.

7. QB Tim Tebow, Florida

QB Tim Tebow, Florida Credit: Getty Images
Tebow led the Gators to two SEC Championships and two National Championships, while winning the Heisman Trophy in 2007. He was a two-time Maxwell Award winner, Davey O'Brien Award recipient and Chic Harley Award winner, among many other collegiate recognitions. To many, Tebow is considered the greatest College Football quarterback of all time.

7. QB Tim Tebow, Florida

Tebow led the Gators to two SEC Championships and two National Championships, while winning the Heisman Trophy in 2007. He was a two-time Maxwell Award winner, Davey O'Brien Award recipient and Chic Harley Award winner, among many other collegiate recognitions. To many, Tebow is considered the greatest College Football quarterback of all time.

6. RB Doak Walker, SMU

RB Doak Walker, SMU Credit: Getty Images
Walker was a three-time All-American at SMU, winning the Maxwell Award in 1947, and the Heisman Trophy in 1948. His dominance led to the Cotton Bowl being called "The House That Doak Built," and the award that goes to the best running back in college football every year is called the Doak Walker Award.

6. RB Doak Walker, SMU

Walker was a three-time All-American at SMU, winning the Maxwell Award in 1947, and the Heisman Trophy in 1948. His dominance led to the Cotton Bowl being called "The House That Doak Built," and the award that goes to the best running back in college football every year is called the Doak Walker Award.

5. RB Red Grange, Illinois

RB Red Grange, Illinois Credit: Getty Images
Nicknamed, "The Galloping Ghost," Grange rushed for 2,071 yards and scored 31 total touchdowns during his three-year career at Illinois, while also recording 11 interceptions on defense. He was a three-time All-American and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

5. RB Red Grange, Illinois

Nicknamed, "The Galloping Ghost," Grange rushed for 2,071 yards and scored 31 total touchdowns during his three-year career at Illinois, while also recording 11 interceptions on defense. He was a three-time All-American and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

4. RB Archie Griffin, Ohio State

RB Archie Griffin, Ohio State Credit: Getty Images
Griffin is the only two-time winner of the Heisman Trophy. He rushed for 5,589 yards and 26 touchdowns during his four years in Columbus. He and Brian Cushing are the only two players to start four Rose Bowl games in history. Griffin won the Walter Camp Award twice, Maxwell Award once and was a three-time All-American.

4. RB Archie Griffin, Ohio State

Griffin is the only two-time winner of the Heisman Trophy. He rushed for 5,589 yards and 26 touchdowns during his four years in Columbus. He and Brian Cushing are the only two players to start four Rose Bowl games in history. Griffin won the Walter Camp Award twice, Maxwell Award once and was a three-time All-American.

3. QB Roger Staubach, Navy

QB Roger Staubach, Navy Credit: Getty Images
Staubach won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Memorial Trophy, all in 1963, when he threw for 1,474 yards and seven touchdowns. For his three-year career, he threw for 4,253 yards and 18 touchdowns. Staubach was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1981.

3. QB Roger Staubach, Navy

Staubach won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Memorial Trophy, all in 1963, when he threw for 1,474 yards and seven touchdowns. For his three-year career, he threw for 4,253 yards and 18 touchdowns. Staubach was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1981.

2. RB Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State

RB Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State Credit: Getty Images
It's tough to rank a guy No. 2 overall based off of one season, but Sanders' 1988 season was that unbelievable. He rushed for 2,850 yards in only 12 games, while scoring a whopping 42 touchdowns. He set single-season NCAA records for rushing yards, total yards, points and touchdowns, among others. Not shockingly, Sanders won the Heisman Trophy that year, for what many call the greatest individual season in college football history.

2. RB Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State

It's tough to rank a guy No. 2 overall based off of one season, but Sanders' 1988 season was that unbelievable. He rushed for 2,850 yards in only 12 games, while scoring a whopping 42 touchdowns. He set single-season NCAA records for rushing yards, total yards, points and touchdowns, among others. Not shockingly, Sanders won the Heisman Trophy that year, for what many call the greatest individual season in college football history.

1. RB Herschel Walker, Georgia

RB Herschel Walker, Georgia Credit: Getty Images
Walker was a three-time All-American, and rushed for 5,259 yards and 76 touchdowns, while adding 26 receptions for 243 yards and four touchdowns during only three seasons in Athens. He won the 1982 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award and Chic Harley Award. Walker was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999.

1. RB Herschel Walker, Georgia

Walker was a three-time All-American, and rushed for 5,259 yards and 76 touchdowns, while adding 26 receptions for 243 yards and four touchdowns during only three seasons in Athens. He won the 1982 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award and Chic Harley Award. Walker was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999.

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